Beechworth – worth a visit

Here, in Victoria we have many small country towns, which in mid 1850′ grew up like mushrooms around gold  mines. In Beechworth area gold was discovered in 1852. In less than a year the population literally exploded as 8000 people  arrived here from all over the world. All of them had that illusive dream of becoming rich very quick. The word about  huge amount of gold spread around, and  more and more prospectors arrived into the town. In  five years population expanded to 20000. To deal with this huge influx of people churches, markets, banks, schools and prisons were built. Now Beechworth is  one of the best preserved gold mining town, which has tens of historical buildings on the National Trust list.

When my bush-walking club decided to organise a trip to Beechworth for the long weekend in January, I was first to join. Even if I have previously visited this town, I wanted to do some hiking here.

On the way to Beechworth we had lots of rain and strong wind. But on arrival the town met us with double rainbow.

 

This is a very famous bakery. Pies are just fantastic – freshly made, hot, juicy, all possible and impossible variety of stuffing.

 

This region is well known for wineries and breweries. This is one of them, basically in the idle of the town. Still working.

 

I found this slogan when we visited local wineries. Truth of life?

 

The town centre was built from bluestone or sandstone. Basically all government buildings were made from sandstone, while churches were predominantly from bluestone.

 

Beautiful architecture. This is a post office.

 

Very European street lights in front of city council.

 

There are lots of different churches all over the town centre. This is Beechworth St Andrew’s  Uniting Church.

 

This old church building is now access point for community support and local events. As I found out from the flyer the next weekend it will be flee market here. Such a shame, but I miss it.

 

St Joseph Church (Roman Catholic Parish of Beechworth) was built in 1875.

 

Historic Christ Church (Anglican Parish). There is Church Street in Beechworth, where churches of all denominations invite their congregations.

 

Solid wooden door at Old Gaol, which is part of historical complex in the middle of the town.

 

Call from the past!

 

Bushranger Ned Kelly was famous for his “unlawful activities”. He was a bit like Robin Hood, but of Australian origin. His gang operated in this area. In August 1880 the Ned Kelly’s trial began in local court house. This sculpture is installed in front yard of the boutique hotel on the Main Street.

 

Very delicate sculpture of sorrow is installed in the graveyard near Historic Christ Church.

 

And another one.

 

And this is an Old Priory, which is a boutique accommodation nowadays. I stayed there with my group.

 

It is kept in amazing condition inside and outside. Just look at the leadlights. How beautiful!

 

Many interesting details like this lamp, for example,  which create cosy and welcoming atmosphere.

 

There are rumours that Old Priory is haunted. I haven’t noticed any paranormal activities myself.

 

I’ve got a soft spot for fireplaces. This one is really beautiful.

 

Old chairs in the hallway.

 

Our menu.

 

In one of the restaurants I found great artwork.

 

I would gladly buy any of these pictures.

 

It was my sweet potato, feta and pickle salad on lavash bread. It was huge and very fresh. Highly recommend to visit Bridge Road restaurant.

 

Lake Kerferd near Beechworth on a beautiful calm morning.

 

Woolshed waterfalls were part of our expedition. The nature is very beautiful.

 

An young boy is trying to find gold in a small creek.

 

On our way to new adventures.

 

This is one happy traveller. It was really hot that day, over 35 degrees in shade, but we finished our 17 km walk. I am very proud of this achievement.

 

My fellow John M. made a short video about our trip. Have a look! Maybe it will inspire someone to join our group! Cheers!

 

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